Reefs and Wrecks

Reefs and Wrecks

Vary your target areas for a multitude of species

Big mangrove snappers like these can be caught on patch reefs in as shallow as 15 to 60 feet of water.

To say our reef and wreck fishing this past week was pretty good would be a complete understatement.

Both seasoned and novice anglers of all ages and genders were kept busy with nonstop rod bending reef and wreck action.

Yellowtail and mangrove snapper continue to be very active on our Marathon area deep reefs and patch reefs, and the good news is that the great snapper action should continue for weeks to come.

Patch reefs are shallow coral and sea fan outcroppings on the top of the reef line. They are usually visible with the naked eye in 25 to 40 feet of water with good visibility. Inhabitants of these rocky patches include, but are not limited to, many snapper and grouper species as well as eels, parrot fish, wrasses and the like…really too many fish to list. This kind of fishing is well suited for families as there is lots of action for everyone onboard.

Please respect our coral and set your anchor in the sand up current of the patch.

The Best Bet team and their clients love fishing the outside edge of the reef or deeper reefin 60 to 90 feet of water. This is where you will find big yellowtail snapper, or what are commonly referred to as flags. They are much bigger than their patch reef siblings and very smart. They will test your angling ability with blistering runs and epic battles.

Minnesota angler Steve caught this mutton snapper in 160 feet of water with little assistance from Capt. Bobby Manske.

Now with dinner in the cooler, let’s head out to the wrecks and really bend the rods.

Our area wreck fishing this time of year can be incredible and this past week was no exception with nice size mutton snappers, amberjacks, almaco jacks and the occasional grouper thrown in to add to the variety.

Remember, variety is the spice of life; so, live it up!

Best Bet for the week ahead: Add some variety to your day on the water by hitting the reefs and wrecks.

 

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